Sunday, August 07, 2016

Custom JUnit4 TestRunner with Guice

It's easy to write your own JUnit test-runner. A developer on the java-platform often writes code in the context of some framework or container platform (Spring, Play, java-EE, OSGi, Guice, whatever) that provides facilities for application bootstrap and dependency injection. When at some point she wants to write a JUnit test suite for some subset of code the developer is faced with the problem of how to recreate the application framework's runtime context within JUnit's runtime context - which assumes a simple no-argument constructor for test-harness classes.

Fortunately - JUnit provides a serviceable solution for augmenting the test suite runtime context in the form of test runners. A developer uses an annotation on his test class to indicate that the tests require a custom runner. For example - Spring provides its SpringJUnit4ClassRunner which allows a test developer to use Spring annotations in her test suties - like this:

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
class WhateverTest {

     @Service(name="whatever")
     Whatever service;

     @Test
     public void testSomething() {
         assertTrue( ... );
     }
     ...
}



The Littleware project includes a system that extends Guice with a simple module and bootstrap mechanism that I was able to integrate with JUnit with a simple LittleTestRunner that follows the same trick that Spring's test runner uses of simply extending JUnit's default BlockJUnit4ClassRunner - overriding the createTest method - easy cheesey:

package littleware.test;

import java.util.List;
import java.util.logging.Level;
import java.util.logging.Logger;
import littleware.bootstrap.LittleBootstrap;
import org.junit.runners.BlockJUnit4ClassRunner;
import org.junit.runners.model.InitializationError;

/**
 * JUnit4 test runner enabled with littleware.bootstrap Guice bootrap and
 * injection. Imitation of SpringJunit4TestRunner:
 *
 */
public class LittleTestRunner extends BlockJUnit4ClassRunner {
    private static final Logger log = Logger.getLogger(LittleTestRunner.class.getName());

    /**
     * Disable BlockJUnit4ClassRunner test-class constructor rules
     */
    @Override
    protected void validateConstructor( List<Throwable> errors ) {}
    
    /**
     * Construct a new {@code LittleTestRunner} and initialize a
     * {@link LittleBootstrap} to provide littleware testing functionality to
     * standard JUnit tests.
     *
     * @param clazz the test class to be run
     * @see #createTestContextManager(Class)
     */
    public LittleTestRunner(Class<?> clazz) throws InitializationError {
        super(clazz);
        if (log.isLoggable(Level.FINE)) {
            log.log(Level.FINE, "constructor called with [{0}]", clazz);
        }
    }

    /**
     * This is where littleware hooks in
     * 
     * @return an instance of getClass constructed via the littleware managed Guice injector
     */
    @Override
    protected Object createTest() {
        try {
            return LittleBootstrap.factory.lookup(this.getTestClass().getJavaClass());
        } catch ( RuntimeException ex ) {
            log.log( Level.SEVERE, "Test class construction failed", ex );
            throw ex;
        }
    }
}

Now I can write tests in Guice's "inject dependencies into the constructor" style - like this:


/**
 * Just run UUIDFactory implementations through a simple test
 */
@RunWith(LittleTestRunner.class)
public class UUIDFactoryTester {

    private final Provider<UUID> uuidFactory;

    /**
     * Constructor stashes UUIDFactory to run test
     * against
     */
    @Inject()
    public UUIDFactoryTester(Provider<UUID> uuidFactory) {
        this.uuidFactory = uuidFactory;
    }

    /**
     * Just get a couple UUID's, then go back and forth to the string
     * representation
     */
    @Test
    public void testUUIDFactory() {

       //...
    }
}

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